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The Australian BioCommons enhances digital life science research through world class collaborative distributed infrastructure. It aims to ensure that Australian life science research remains globally competitive, through sustained strategic leadership, research community engagement, digital service provision, training and support.

Dr. Ferhat Ay and his lab are currently located at the La Jolla Institute of Immunology. Our lab focuses on the study of the 3D genome including the development of statistical tools to better interrogate functions and associations between the 3D genome and other biological factors.

The BioExcel Building Blocks (biobb) software library is a collection of Python wrappers on top of popular biomolecular simulation tools. This library offers a layer of interoperability between the wrapped tools, which make them compatible and prepared to be directly interconnected to build complex biomolecular workflows. The building blocks can be used in many different workflow systems, including Galaxy, CWL, Jupyter Notebook and PyCOMPSs – notably their ...

Team developing BioExcel best practice guides

Space: BioExcel

Public web page: https://docs.bioexcel.eu/

The Common Workflow Language (CWL) is an open standard for describing analysis workflows and tools in a way that makes them portable and scalable across a variety of software and hardware environments, from workstations to cluster, cloud, and high performance computing (HPC) environments. CWL is designed to meet the needs of data-intensive science, such as Bioinformatics, Medical Imaging, Astronomy, High Energy Physics, and Machine Learning.CWL is developed by a multi-vendor working group consisting ...

Space: Independent Teams

Public web page: https://www.commonwl.org/

Start date: 11th Jul 2014

Nextflow pipelines for running the ARTIC network's fieldbioinformatics tools (https://github.com/artic-network/fieldbioinformatics), with a focus on ncov2019

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